March Short Book Reviews

The Fourth Bear – Jasper Fforde. Alright. I laughed at some of the puns (the Oddly Familiar Deja Vu Club) but it wasn’t as sparkling as the Thursday Next books. The threats weren’t threatening, the comedy sometimes felt forced. I really like fairytale retellings, but I think Fforde handled retellings of literature better. I liked Jack Spratt – I have a soft spot for hard-bitten, even noirish, policemen with complicated pasts – but he was a bit too affected by his past and I didn’t like the way his ex-wife was portrayed.

The Pinhoe Egg – Diana Wynne Jones. Another “meh”, but within the context of the rest of DWJ’s books, so that’s a pretty good “meh” : ) Although Magicians of Caprona was one of my earliest favourites, I don’t rank the Chrestomanci books as a whole among my favourites of her books. I like the characters and the world but they often leave me feeling as if there is something more behind the background, some part of the story I can’t quite get at or which is still waiting to be told. But it has a cat who walk through walls.

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay – Michael Chabon. It was an odd experience reading this, because the subject matter and milieu belong to genres I am used to (comics, graphic novels, magic realism, slight surrealism) but the book itself is a Novel, which does things differently, and is a genre which seems obliged to have more gritty sexuality in it and less satisfying endings than the genres I’m used to (although, as Novels go, the ending of this one wasn’t bad). A similar thing happened with Year of Wonders which I would have liked as an Historical, Fantasy or Alternate History novel but really took against as a Novel. I liked Chabon’s style, I really liked that he anchored the characters in history and made their fictional fictional creations (The Escapist, et al) seem so real I wanted to be able to pick up one of the comics and look at Joe’s drawing, or look for references to the characters and their creations in the anti-comic literature of the time. Usually this would bother me – I often feel cheated by reading historical fiction, but this fictionalised history paralleling the real rise of the comic book hero was excellent, interesting, entertaining, helpful and gratifying. I liked the faint elements of the fantastic and can’t decide if I wanted them explained or not. I’d have a hard time lending it for reasons of certain scenes.

Also, Song of Songs, and if you want to scar your children, read this aloud as a family with parts assigned appropriately.

3 thoughts on “March Short Book Reviews

  1. I think I liked ‘Pinhoe Egg’ more than you did. But I can’t disagree with anything you said. Perhaps because DWJ is, on the whole, a lot better than most. And yes, there is a cat who walks through walls.
    :)

    Good to know I’m not missing a huge lot with not having read the others.

    And I have just rediscovered two books which I started reading before the holidays and stashed away to read later. That means I’ve started-with-intent-to-finish more books in this house than I can count on one hand.

    *Johnathan Strange and Mr Norrell
    *The Big Over Easy
    *In the Night Garden
    *The Door Within
    *Three Men in a Boat
    *To Say Nothing of the Dog
    *Salamander
    *Illuminations
    *The Yiddish Policeman’s Union

    The devotional book your parents gave me for Christmas, however, is doing splendidly, which is some consolation, at least. And I did manage to complete all five available installments of ‘Fables’.

  2. Pingback: June and July Short Book Reviews « Errantry

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