Appearances to the contrary, my life has not in fact been wholly consumed by drawing. I am still turning up for work, going to the theatre, rewatching Ladyhawke* and even writing.

I have not written about writing very much because it takes longer to finish a piece and there aren’t as many cool, useful and arguably necessary accessories, but I am still writing at least one hundred words every day. Sometimes they are only fragmentary scenes and conversations, glimpses of characters, playing with ideas. It is all practice – treading water at least if not actually going anywhere – and is self-regulating because eventually I get frustrated and want to produce something coherent and complete.

The main works in progress are currently (working titles): “The Magedan” – a sword and sorcery short story the real hero of which is the Rule of Law; “Chattering Jack” – a little old-school dark piece; and “Angie Nettles” – a rural fantasy/fairytale retelling.

The story I mentioned here has been further edited (thanks to Aimee’s very helpful critique) and after encouragement from my writing group has been sent out into the world again. It is an urban fantasy and people seem to have liked it but I am still alternating between toleration and loathing – at least the alternations are only daily now instead of every five minutes.

I am also considering overhauling two other stories – stretching “Fierce Bad Rabbit” into a proper story (which is problematic because currently it is wierd/dark/horror but if I lengthen it may become a murder mystery and change genres) and turning “Stars Over Pilgrim’s Ford” (a parable/excuse for a sword fight) completely inside out and into a prequel for “The Magedan”.

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If I post more about writing, I might talk about: The Problem with Positivity; Nuclear Testing Grounds; Longhand; Switching sides; and Jean Luis Borges and the Cultural Cringe. But those are only possibilities, not promises.

*No, it’s not a wonderful movie. It falls between To the Ends of Time and Lord of the Rings – subtract the difference and you get left with some odd facial expressions and corny lines, which Ladyhawke has plenty of. But the composition of the scenes is gorgeous – watched wide-screen format they are set up like the most beautiful fantasy paintings, or marvellous patterns of light and shadow. I was kind of awestruck, actually.