A Magic Mirror — by Spike Deane

This weekend, I gave the keynote presentation for the Australian Fairy Tale Society‘s 2020 conference: Magic Mirrors.

And by post I received a beautiful presenter gift, made by Canberra fairy-tale glass artist Spike Deane (I’m a fan of her work, and already have a lovely glass key). But this was something new — it’s a little gold compact…

Photos from Spike Deane, with permission

But when opened, and mirrored in itself, in blue glass are the words Once Upon a Time

Photos from Spike Deane, with permission

Spike writes of her process:

I had thoughts of using a mirror compact and doing something to it. Ideas came and went. I bought a lovely vintage powder compact, which sunk 60% of the budget. I settled on the idea of replacing the powder section with an engraved piece of coloured glass, with the text engraved in a way that to read it you are required to look in the mirror.

Happy with that concept I then mulled over how to create some ‘flash glass’. Flash glass is sheet glass with a very thin layer of colour on one side. When you sandblast or engrave away the coloured side you can create imagery or pattern. I could buy some, but $$$… make some, but $$$ and then guess what fell into my lap?

A large piece of blue blown glass was being offered FREE at the Canberra Glassworks, so long, as that person smashed the object. I jumped at the chance and claimed my prize. I clobbered it with a hammer (safely and satisfyingly).

I then cut a small circle out of one of the shards (harder than you would think). I ground the edges and engraved some lettering on one side and flourishes on the other.

From Spike Deane’s blog: https://www.spikedeane.com/post/magicmirrors

It’s a beautiful object, light and solid and perfectly weighted in the hollow of a palm.

You can find more of Spike’s work online here:

4 thoughts on “A Magic Mirror — by Spike Deane

  1. Pingback: AFTS Conference – reflections | Kathleen Jennings

  2. Pingback: June post round-up | Kathleen Jennings

  3. Pingback: Observation Journal: Lessons for presentations and conferences | Kathleen Jennings

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