Justin Devine: interview — art and books

A few days ago I posted the lovely lovely fanart of Flyaway that Justin Devine created for his review on Drawn to Culture.

So I asked Justin if he could answer a few questions (thinks not to say to a reviewer…) and he agreed!

Here, now, is Justin, “a fine artist and illustrator from California, who now resides in the Midwest with his wife and too many cats.”

Justin Devine by Justin Devine

And here is the interview:

Kathleen: So you’re a fine artist and illustrator, but you also do fanart (to be clear, this is a thing of which I thoroughly approve). How do the two relate for you — and/or how do the things you are a fan of feedback into your fine art and illustration career?

Justin: As I progress in my art career, I’m finding myself drawn less (so to speak) to working in a fine art/gallery-painting mode, and am instead leaning more towards storybook illustration, comics, and other forms of narrative art. In that respect, the stuff I’m doing for Drawn to Culture isn’t very different from my personal work at all. In fact, most of the designs I have available for sale right now (as prints or other products) are inspired by cult movies, tv shows, and/or books I love.

The only real difference between pieces I produce for the blog and work I’d show in a portfolio is the amount of time I put into them. Well, that, and the DTC drawings tend to be a little more portrait-driven than my regular work.

Kathleen: For the uninitiated: who/what/why is Drawn to Culture?

Justin: I often call Drawn to Culture a fanart blog, for simplicity’s sake, but what it really is is an illustrated pop culture recommendation feed.

The concept is that I—along with whatever other artists want to join in that week—recommend the movies, games, books, etc. that have been giving us life recently, and we supplement our recommendations with pieces of art which pay homage to those cultural products and (hopefully) get other people excited about them, too.

(Basically, it’s the “What’s Making Us Happy This Week” segment from NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour, but with drawings)

I started the blog last year (with help from my friend, the excellent Vincent Kukua) in part because we wanted to provide a regular ongoing challenge for ourselves, but also because we wanted to create a little bit of art-community centered people sharing what they love. In the just-over-a-year DTC has been going, we’ve showcased over 100 illustrations from almost two dozen artists.

Kathleen: One of the things about fanart that I adore is, as I said, getting to read over someone’s shoulder — reading is a great spectator sport at the best of times, and getting that experience plus art is just <chef’s kiss>. Could you tell me a bit about how you combine reviews and art — and what you’re trying to say in a piece of art vs in a review?

Justin: Basically, whenever I read any book or watch any movie, I try to imagine what I’d include on a cover or poster for that piece of media. As such, I’m always on the lookout for the characters, objects, and/or symbols I think would lend a compelling amount of specificity to an illustration without giving too much of the plot away (and these are usually the subjects for my DTC pieces).

The constraints of trying to make art with a somewhat tight (if self-imposed) deadline, and which is mainly going to be seen in a little square on Instagram, limits the mental-book-cover exercise somewhat, but the thinking is still there.

The Widening Gyre — Justin Devine (available as a print on InPrnt)

Kathleen: If we met in person I would probably get extremely specific about “quality of line” and that little tassled finial on the circle — but since this is written, would you be able to tell me a bit about the thought and art process for the illustration for Flyaway? (Do you have any process shots/layers?)

Justin: I didn’t save any progress layers, unfortunately.

I recently (finally) got an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil, and for the past couple of months, I’ve been trying to learn how to draw digitally while retaining some of the line quality I’ve cultivated in my physical media/ink drawings.

When I started on this piece (which is entirely digital, except for the applied watercolor wash texture), I thought that drawing a couple of birds in almost-profile with some lightly scrolling botanicals was the kind of thing I could do in my sleep, because I’ve done it so often on paper. For whatever reason though, this particular drawing ended up being weirdly difficult for me to get right. In the end, though, I’m pleased with how this closely this digital drawing resembles what I would have done in pen-and-ink.

Kathleen: Flyaway has art through it, as well as on the cover, and I’m interested to know (a) how much cover art — and more so, interior art — affects how you read a book, and (b) what you do with your awareness of that art when you put together a new illustration?

Justin: I’ve been a voracious listener of audiobooks for the last couple years, and a vast majority of the books I’ve consumed during that time have been in an audio format. So, while I may be familiar with the art associated with a particular title because I follow the illustrator or publisher online, I usually don’t have it in front of me, except perhaps in thumbnail form. This certainly helps me not be overly influenced by the work that’s already there.

All that to say: while I actually now own Flyway in both the audio and print versions, I had already made a sketch by the time I acquired the latter. I had no idea, for example, how many birds cutouts were sprinkled throughout the book! I knew from my first listening though that I wanted to feature the words “coward” and “monster,” which are both so evocative, and the lantern bush blooms which are so specific and also so much fun to draw. Plus a couple of birds, because, clearly.

When I create an illustration inspired by straight narration—or even something photographic, like a live-action TV show or movie—the act of drawing itself seems interpretive. I’ve found during the past year of doing DTC (and before that, creating character sketches for myself), that the hardest things to create fanart for are comics, cartoons, or other extensively illustrated works, because it’s hard to translate a drawn image into a NEW drawn image, and imbue it with personal style while keeping it looking like itself.

Kathleen: Oh, hey! We’re both Light Grey Art Lab illustrators, too — and you’re in World Roulette! That involved a little bit of writing as well as visual worldbuilding. How do you approach writing, as an illustrator — particularly of something you’ve illustrated?

Justin: This was actually my first time doing a piece for LGAL, and I’m thrilled to be included! Although I’ve followed them for years, I visited the physical gallery space for the first time last year, and was excited to see one of your pieces on the postcard display as soon as I walked in!

Per my approach to the writing, I think anytime someone creates a scene or character from scratch, they’re answering a constant stream of questions as they go along: who’s populating this setting? What are they wearing? Why this, instead of that? etc. So, when I approached the text portion of the World Roulette piece, I saw it as a matter of simply writing out the answers to those internal questions and then rewriting that block of text to be slightly story-shaped.

My biggest challenge with that particular project was editing down my blurb to within the word-count limit (I tend to be fairly wordy when I write, which I’m sure is obvious from all my answers so far).

Kathleen: What are you excited about now, and/or what are you working on (or what’s already out) that you’d most like to wave around and shout about?

Justin: In addition to Drawn to Culture—which is always looking for contributors, btw, in case anyone reading this wants to participate—and the Light Grey Art Lab show you mentioned above; my wife, the fabulously talented Megan Lynn Kott, and I co-wrote/illustrated a book last year (my first, her second), which we’re both super excited about!

The book comes out on September 1st and is called Unfamiliar Familiars: Extraordinary Animal Companions for the Modern Witch. It’s basically a humorous take on the animal fact reference book, with a witchy twist. Even though the kind of writing we did for this book is more list- and blurb-based than it is novelistic, it was still the most writing either of us had done in years. That made working on it a little terrifying, but it was also lots of fun to explore. The book is chock-full of jokes (which at least we think are funny), esoteric pop culture references, and cute animal paintings, and we can’t wait for it to hit shelves soon.

From Chronicle/Hardie Grant

Justin can be found online in the following places:

Flyawayadjacent interviews

And since this seems to be becoming a series, some previous interviews that have happened due to Flyaway connections:

Read and Seen — February 2020

2020-03-05-Book-sketches-Feb

Responses to Keep Going and Hilda and the Troll (left) and False Colours (right)

Books:

  • Keep Going Austin Kleon (good, but personally I found Steal Like an Artist and Show Your Work less diffuse and more resonant).
  • False Colours — Georgette Heyer (so utterly gentle, and my favourite combination of high-stakes-for-characters/low-stakes-for-readers — see also Arabella and those productions of Twelfth Night where Orsino works out Viola’s deal pretty early on). The hero’s mother, Lady Amabel, irritates some of my friends but I love her, which might be partly attributable to Phyllida Nash’s beautiful narration: False Colours on Audible).
  • Hilda and the Troll — Luke Pearson (so charming — I already loved the series, and the clean distinct style, which is coming into focus here)
  • Hilda and the Midnight Giant — Luke Pearson (see above, and they started me thinking more about visuals and stylisation — and trolls and giants and, of course, trollish giants)
  • The Creeps — Fran Krause (perfect bite-size frights, alarms, and nervous laughs: excellent sequel to the equally excellent Deep Dark Fears, and together with Lynda Barry’s Syllabus refined the Pearson thoughts into smaller, four-panel formats — see also the Deep Dark Fears tumblr)
  • British Prints from the Machine Age — Stephanie Lussier (I’m trying to actually sit down and read through art books occasionally)
  • His Countess for a Week — Sarah Mallory
  • Certain Manuscripts for Secret Illustration Purposes

2020-03-02-FebruaryBooks2

Some individual panels

I did some little comic responses to various books and films, but they got out of hand and cross-pollinated. These are a few individual panels. They’re all a bit Luke Pearson/Fran Krause inflected, with some distant False Colours DNA (top left), a dash of Emma (top right), some Machine Age (bottom left), and some sort of Birds of Prey/Sarah Mallory mash-up (bottom right).

Movies:

  • Birds of Prey (fun and bright, and just a slightly different eye on things)
  • Emma. (fun and bright, but not quite enough of a different eye on things for what I wanted from it; great music, excellent supporting Nighy; also there’s an image that is shown in the first lecture of a subject I tutor, and I burst out laughing when I saw it (partially!) repeated in the film — Luxury or The Comforts of a Rumpford, a deliberate reference, h/t Peter for the link).

Other:

  • David Suchet, Poirot and More: A Retrospective (fascinating explanations, particularly of character notes, finding the right voice, the speed at which Freud would have walked, and rituals of exit)
  • The New Pornographers, at The Triffid (I know, Mother, I know!) (a lovely show, and they feel a lot more rock when heard live; also, for reasons, I was playing a listening game and am now convinced that while it would be tricky, it would be possible to make a rock opera of Emma).

(Some links are affiliate links, which just means I get a teeny commission if you buy something through them, but for preference, support good local bookstores!)

Read and Seen — January 2020

KJennings-JanuaryBookSketches

I’ve been trying to do a bit more fan-art/loosely-inspired sketches this year. Mostly (but not entirely) of books. These are based on January’s reading.

Books (not including manuscripts for illustration)

  • The Nightjar — Deborah Hewitt (this made me look up nightjars, which are kind of amazing)
  • Silver in the Wood — Emily Tesh (bolshie dryads!)
  • I See, I See — R. Henderson (delightful turn-about picture book by a Brisbane author: recommended, and everyone I’ve shown it to so far has bought it)
  • Domestic Life in England — Norah Lofts (flawed yet captures the acceleration of history)
  • Show Your Work — Austin Kleon (… great, actually — I tend to resist small square books)
  • Through the Woods — Emily Carroll (creepy-beautiful!)

(I have longer ramblier thoughts on Patreon).

Movies

  • Little Women (Amy!)
  • JoJo Rabbit (feels in some respects (for narrative reasons I think are deliberate) like a movie about East Berlin)

Other

 

Kiss Me Deer

Kiss Me Deer

Here’s a little gouache painting I did to practice deer (and use up paint!) – it’s ever-so-slightly fanart for the game “Kiss Me Deer” as played by the Bennet sisters in the book of Pride & Prejudice & Zombies).

It was also preparation for another painting I was making as a gift (that one is for slightly more limited circulation, but can be seen at the Duck level & above on my Patreon).

The art of scanning gouache is one which I have yet to study in more detail. Perhaps photography is the way to go.

Kiss Me Deer

Speaking of the Patreon, if you’d like to throw a dollar in the hat towards the monthly calendar, or subscribe at a higher level to get extra printable stationery and behind-the-scene peeks at upcoming projects, this is a great way to do it. You could even put it on your wishlist!

Introducing Team Mist: Alexandria Neonakis

Alexandria Neonakis is the first member of Light Grey Art Lab‘s 2016 Iceland Residency: Team Mist to volunteer to be introduced!

Alexandria Neonakis

Alexandria Neonakis

K: What lights you up about what you do?

Alexandria: I love it when something accidental happens in a piece that really helps with whatever narrative i’m trying to get across. When it happens, it feels like everything’s clicking nicely into place.

K: Do you have an example? 

Alexandria: This isn’t necessarily my favorite image but the light cutting across the top left and not appearing anywhere else was an accident. I had initially had a bit of light towards the bottom of the image as well, but some layers got turned off and I felt it just sold the story so much better. It also felt like a much bolder choice than my original intention.

Alexandria Neonakis: Weasley Wizard Wheezes

Alexandria Neonakis: Weasley Wizard Wheezes

I also was painting the “extendable ears” sign onto the wall when i came up with the idea that his missing ear wouldn’t have been magically replaced, he probably wears an extendable ear so as not to scare kids who come into the store. then when they ask him a question, he can pull the ear towards them and ask them to speak up.

I really love fleshing out these off-screen moments in a well know story, particularly with Harry Potter which has been a huge influence on me for most of my life. I know fan art gets a lot of flack, but I feel there’s a real place for it, and it’s often a nice gateway for people to start exploring their own narratives. It certainly has been for me.

K: Where can we find you?

Alexandria: My tumblr is alexneonakis.tumblr.com  and my website is alexneonakis.com :)