October Calendar – skeletons

October-calendar-art-lowres

The October calendar is here, with the support of my patrons (who get it early, along with stationery and other things!).

IMG_7253 (1)

Here is a door hanger from last month’s design

It is spring here (and a warm one!) but I know that is not the primary festive focus of friends in other hemispheres. So this month it is rather happy skeletons.

October-calendar-detail

You can print them either pre-coloured, or to colour in yourself. And if you have a spare $1, please do consider supporting me on Patreon, which helps make the calendars (and more!) possible.

In other news: The harpies are up on Redbubble as T-shirts, notebooks, scarves etc; The River Bank has been published and is very beautiful; the new limited edition Angela Slatter story The Tallow Wife (illustrated by me!) is available at Conflux this weekend, and we are both here to sign it; I will be going to the World Fantasy Convention in San Antonio at the beginning of November, and (all going well) will have original art for sale there.

October Calendar - ColourOctober Calendar - Lines

 

October calendar

October calendar detail

Some spooky things in trees for October!

October calendar detail

I did this at the last minute, which is why there is so much going on in the picture. I also watched a lot of Frost tonight. And did some other illustrations. And it is 2am, good grief. My eyes basically look like the eyes in these pictures.

October calendar art

I changed the order in which I coloured the under-layers, and am getting closer to a useful effect.

OctoberColourBase.jpg

By clicking on the images below, you can print the calendar either pre-coloured or for colouring in.

 

octobercolour

octoberlines

And I’ve put it up on Redbubble, too, on assorted things.

American sketchbook 2014 part 2 – Boston and Salem

Note: If you’d like to see more detail, just click on an image. You should go through to its Flickr page where you can look at a larger version of it.

The first part of the report is at Part 1 – New York, New York

I caught the bus from New York to Boston, through hours of autumn foliage. Here are some tree sketches from a moving vehicle, trying to approximate colour with a limited range of pens, and to catch the shape and pattern of leaves from a distance and at speed.

Page 7

Boston! Where the squirrels are tough and muscular and will beat you up for food. Also, Leif Erikson.

Page 8

A visit with Theodora Goss, full of books and fairytales. Then off to the Goya exhibition at the MFA! It is always striking to see paintings in the life. In the case of the Goyas, there was such a wonderful, candid, intense, scribbly nature to the art – both texture (ink and engravings) and air. The Family of the Infante Don Luis is enchantingly candid, like a photo during the setup for a family photoshoot – some are posed, some are wandering in or distracted by an adjustment, one man grins directly at the viewer…

Page 9A

Francisco de Goya. The Family of the Infante Don Luis de Borbón. 1783

Lively and all of them full of more than one story – full of story.

Page 9B

 

(I also visited the Jamie Wyeth exhibit, but was running out of time so only sketched one seagull).Goya, o guarda-sol

I then visited my first Blick Art Materials store, which was marvellous. Fortunately, I was travelling light on this leg, having sent my luggage ahead with Kelly to Northampton.  And on Thursday evening, I took the ferry to Salem.

Page 10

Halloween is an interesting time to visit Salem! Between the costumes, the views of early colonial American history are frequent and fascinated me because the visual vocabulary is so different from the corresponding period in Australia. Our European images really start off with Georgian aesthetics.

Page 11

Here is the detail of some notes on the progression of gravestones – the skull-and-wings which is most common in the earlier, pragmatic, puritan, ‘in the midst of life we are in death’, and is replaced by romantic imagery of angels, willows and urns.

Untitled-11Detail

The Nathanael Mather inscription “an aged person that had seen but nineteen winters in the world” was used by Hawthorne in one of his stories, but I am not entirely sure what it means.

Next, the Peabody Essex Museum, which was full of small wonders, and a brace of brave figureheads.

Page 12

A lovely little velocipede. And I did visit the House of the Seven Gables, of interest for many reasons, including that the restoration for tourists was based on a novel rather than the history of the book, and is old enough (over 100 years) to of itself be of historical interest.

Page 13

By now it was Halloween properly. I sat out on the sidewalk with the neighbours to man a candy table in the cold (we had warming beverages), then went out to roam the streets, eat deep-fried confectionary and sketch costumes.

Page 14

 

Next in the series is Part Three: Western Massachusetts and World Fantasy Convention

———————

This project is supported by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland, part of the Department of Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the Arts. thumbnail

The Dalek of Sleepy Hollow (with bonus Austen)

The Dalek of Sleepy Hollow

This instalment of the Dalek Game is for Halloween and Washington Irving’s Legend of Sleepy Hollow. There is a lovely edition illustrated by Arthur Rackham, and this Dalek is encountering Rackham’s Ichabod Crane.

Growing up in Australia, Halloween was not an event – my mother, however, had many stories from her childhood in America, so my image of Halloween is in soft nostalgic shades, being made up of those tales, the costumes in E.T. and readings of poor Ichabod Crane’s misadventure with a pumpkin in Sleepy Hollow.

Australian pumpkins are very different from American ones, but I still consider them an unsettling vegetable. In my experience, they climb trees and are often found hiding under the bedclothes – I am not the only visitor to my parents’ house to have had this encounter.

It is 200 years since the first of Jane Austen’s novels was published. I was away from my usual equipment, but drew the following as part of the general spirit of celebration on Twitter this morning (aware that the first published was not P&P):

Dalek and Prejudice

In other news: I did manage to get a picture up for last week’s Illustration Friday: Fuel (because not everything is about Daleks, yet). There have been some lovely reviews of Steampunk!, and this one from Karen Meisner at io9 mentions my comic.

Five things I did not buy in America

Two weeks before I flew, a… unique individual gave me two valuable insights. One was that I would meet the love of my life in America (I either didn’t, or don’t know it yet). The other was to buy two things which are not obtainable over here. I will not tell you what they were because then Errantry would turn up on completely different google searches to the current standards of “mr squiggle knit” and “teapot microwave Sydney proof”. I did not buy those two things.

Here are five other things I did not buy, but should have:

  1. Autumn merchandise: Fabric and paper autumn leaves, oak leaf cookie cutters and a particularly hideous purple-and-orange owl-patterned bandanna.
  2. More cheap Moleskines (I did buy two).
  3. I heart NY t-shirts, ironic alteration, for the purposes of.
  4. Novels. $8 new! Why, why, why did I not buy more books?
  5. Cinnamon rolls. With cream cheese icing/sauce. More than two of.

Pumpkins


Pumpkins

Originally uploaded by tanaudel

We are spending a lot of time saying sentences beginning with “They really…”

In this case, after seeing the pumpkins outside a grocery store, “They really are that colour!”