TV Sketching: My Life is Murder

A few more My Life is Murder sketches. The usual rule: no pausing while drawing.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from My Life is Murder

We’re on to season two, and Alexa (Lucy Lawless) and Madison (Ebony Vagulans) have relocated from Melbourne to Auckland.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from My Life is Murder

For more TV sketches, see TV sketching.

TV Sketching: The Snoop Sisters and Do Not Fold, Spindle or Mutilate

Some more TV sketching — this time The Snoop Sisters: “The Devil Made Me Do It” (1974).

(The rule of TV sketching is that I can’t pause the show.)

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters

This episode had even more flowing draperies than usual — especially Cyril Ritchard as The Great Morlock.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters

This episode even had Alice Cooper in it.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters

The bonus sketches below are from what we started watching first, expecting a Snoop SIsters episode. It was in fact Do Not Fold, Spindle or Mutilate (1971), which also starred Helen Hayes and Mildred Natwick as part of a group of friends who decide to commit computer dating fraud (in 1971). I do plan to finish watching it at some point, if only for those sweeping gowns.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from Do Not Fold, Spindle or Mutilate

For more TV sketches, see the TV sketching tag.

TV Sketching: Murder, She Wrote and The Snoop Sisters

The rule of TV sketching is that I can’t pause the show.

I bought my father the DVD box set of Murder, She Wrote for Christmas, which means I have to visit to watch it, so sketches might be sporadic.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from Murder She Wrote
Murder, She Wrote, S1E7 “Lovers and Other Killers”

In this episode, I was struck by how much lilac was used.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from Murder She Wrote
Murder, She Wrote, S1E7 “Lovers and Other Killers”

I also really like that final sketch, above, in the blue blouse.

Back from my parents’ place, and watching The Snoop Sisters with my housemate. Pre-Jessica Fletcher crime writers solving crimes. I love Gwendolyn and Ernesta’s 1920s/1970s silhouettes.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters
The Snoop SIsters, “Fear is a Free-Throw”

Not nearly as much lilac, but still present. Also background nurses reacting to plot.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters
The Snoop SIsters, “Fear is a Free-Throw”

And dramatic falls/sprawls against potted plants.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters
The Snoop SIsters, “Fear is a Free-Throw”

For more TV sketches, see TV sketching.

TV Sketching: My Life is Murder and The Snoop Sisters

I’m frantically trying to finish a large project, but dinner involves murder mysteries, so I have got in a few sketches, from My Life is Murder (S1E6, 2019) and The Snoop Sisters (E1, 1973)

The rule of TV sketching is that I can’t pause the show.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from My Life is Murder (including a long lilac trench-coat-ish jacket)

Above, Lucy Lawless & Ebony Vagulans, both wearing great clothes in rather different styles and degrees of vividness.

Below, night calls.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from My Life is Murder (including a cat)
My Life is Murder, S1E6, “Another Bloody Podcast”

The Snoop Sisters only has a pilot and four episodes (alas!). The 1970s fashion is a delight, but Helen Hayes and Mildred Natwick (Ernesta and Gwendolyn) have marvelous silhouettes from much earlier eras of fashion.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters (including two older ladies standing on a forklift)
The Snoop Sisters, E1, “Corpse and Robbers”
Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters (including a lady in a dramatic deep blue gown)
The Snoop Sisters, E1, “Corpse and Robbers”

And of course, there’s the Lincoln.

Small fast digital sketches of multiple characters and costumes from The Snoop Sisters (including a lady with many dogs, some pallbearers, and a dramatic red dress)
The Snoop Sisters, E1, “Corpse and Robbers”

For more TV sketches, see TV sketching.

TV Sketching: Shakespeare & Hathaway

I will put up the travel sketches once I’ve scanned them, but in the meantime: Some TV sketching! Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators, Season 4 Episode 2 (f.i.n.a.l.l.y. available in Australia).

Digital sketches of many small people from Shakespeare & Hathaway, some dancing

As usual, the rule is: no pausing the show.

I didn’t sketch the first episode because I was eating dinner at the time, but I’m not ruling out revisiting it.

Digital sketches of many small people from Shakespeare & Hathaway, some dancing

These are mostly featuring Sebastian and Luella, of course.

For more TV sketching, see the tag: TV sketching.

TV Sketching: Agatha Christie’s Criminal Games

In this instalment of tv sketching, I’ve discovered Les Petits Meurtres d’Agatha Christie (Wikipedia; AgathaChristie.com), aka Agatha Christie’s Criminal Games / Little Murders. Only one season (one from the 1950s-set series — the season numbering is convoluted) is currently available here on SBS On Demand, and only for a few more days.

The usual TV sketching rule applies — no pausing.

Digital sketches of people from S3 E1 of Agatha Christie's Criminal Games
“The Pale Horse”

In terms of its heightened reality / little world / stagey fun, it’s on par with Queens of Mystery, Ms Fisher’s Modern Murder Mysteries, and Shakespeare & Hathaway.

Digital sketches of people from S3 E1 of Agatha Christie's Criminal Games
“The Pale Horse”

With melodramatic poses and distinct costuming choices, this makes it a lot of fun to sketch.

Digital sketches of people from S3 E1 of Agatha Christie's Criminal Games
“The Pale Horse”

It’s particularly fond of warm reds and mint greens.

Digital sketches of people from S3 E1 of Agatha Christie's Criminal Games
“The Pale Horse”

The sketches above are from “The Pale Horse”, and those below are from “The Protheroe Mystery”.

Digital sketches of people from S3 E2 of Agatha Christie's Criminal Games
“The Protheroe Mystery”
Digital sketches of people from S3 E2 of Agatha Christie's Criminal Games
“The Protheroe Mystery”
Digital sketches of people from S3 E2 of Agatha Christie's Criminal Games
“The Protheroe Mystery”

For other TV sketching, see the TV SKETCHING category.

Support and/or follow

If you’d like to support art and writing and posts like this about it, here are some options!

TV Sketching: Midsomer Murders (S22 E5&6)

Here are the remaining TV sketches for season 22 of Midsomer Murders, episodes 5 (“For Death Prepare”) and 6 (“The Witches of Angel’s Rise”).

For other TV sketching, see TV SKETCHING. For previous Midsomer Murders sketches specifically, see:

The rule is: I can’t pause the show while sketching.

First, “For Death Prepare”, in which rehearsals for Pirates of Penzance are interrupted several times (and some very early Midsomer tropes are teased).

Little digital sketches of figures and characters from Midsomer Murders s22e5
Midsomer Murders s22e5: For Death Prepare

It’s a delight drawing characters in flamboyant costumes (see also the Murder, She Wrote sketches). The flashy shapes and colours are easy to focus on, which takes some of the stress off drawing the other sections.

I kind of love those flying birds below, top right.

Little digital sketches of figures and characters from Midsomer Murders s22e5
Midsomer Murders s22e5: For Death Prepare

And as ever, lighting and protective wear remain interesting and entertaining to draw.

Little digital sketches of figures and characters from Midsomer Murders s22e5
Midsomer Murders s22e5: For Death Prepare

The Witches of Angel’s Rise skewed more towards Gothic melodrama.

Little digital sketches of figures and characters from Midsomer Murders s22e6
Midsomer Murders s22e6: The Witches of Angel’s Rise

Below, I particularly enjoyed (enjoyed?) speed-drawing the reflection in the mirrored sphere (top right), and sketching a painting (lower left) and the bucket reflections (lower right).

Little digital sketches of figures and characters from Midsomer Murders s22e6
Midsomer Murders s22e6: The Witches of Angel’s Rise

I also really like that little sketch of the figure and the bowl, third down on the right — simple shading and strong light.

Little digital sketches of figures and characters from Midsomer Murders s22e6
Midsomer Murders s22e6: The Witches of Angel’s Rise

Also, as ever, the architecture of Midsomer (above) is a delight to draw, although the camera rarely lingers quite long enough.

Also, generally, I like the excuse to use orange.

Little digital sketches of figures and characters from Midsomer Murders s22e6
Midsomer Murders s22e6: The Witches of Angel’s Rise

For other TV sketching, see TV SKETCHING. For previous Midsomer Murders sketches specifically, see:

Support and/or follow

If you’d like to support art and writing and posts like this about it, here are some options!

TV Sketching: Queens of Mystery

The last TV sketches for season 2 of Queens of Mystery, “The Raven”, episodes 5 and 6.

Previous in the series

As usual, the rule of TV sketching is I can’t pause the show. These sketches are done on the iPad in Procreate.

I wish there’d been time to catch the architecture, which was delightful
random background traffic cone costume
fires and arches
knives at twilight
lighting

This was a very fun season to sketch — so much colour and slightly heightened/stylised imagery. And some gorgeous locations.

All tv sketches are under the “TV sketching” tag, and the Previous Queens of Mystery sketches are here:

TV sketching: Queens of Mystery

More tv sketches (done on the iPad using Procreate) of Queens of Mystery Season 2 Episodes 3 & 4, “The Modern Art of Murder” (Acorn TV).

Artists behaving badly
This pink
Motorbikes and planes
Blues, and variably-effective sneaking
Lighting challenges — also, foreshortening is an adventure when drawn in a hurry
staying cool

In between seasons 1 and 2, the actress playing the main character, Mathilda Stone, changed, and the effect is practically seamless. Florence Hall is a good physical match to Olivia Vinall, but she steps — and leans — into the role fully, and really sells the transition. In addition to her work, the strong colour coding and silhouette choices of the show work fabulously to blend the edges of the change. I’d love to hear about the choices and work involved in Florence Hall inhabiting this existing role.

(Everyone did a fabulous job, clearly, because I didn’t notice except for thinking Mathilda’s cheeks were somehow different when she smiled, until Carl pointed it out in the comments to the last set of sketches.)

Here’s a screenshot of the sketches in progress, because this show is making me use colours I wouldn’t usually choose.

Previous TV sketches can be found under the tag TV sketching.

Also, I’ve just started setting up a mailing list. It won’t be a newsletter — only the occasional email for any major updates (publication announcements, exhibitions, etc) and the odd round-up of things you might not want to have missed. If that’s for you, the (extremely early version of) the sign-up page is here:

Mailing List Sign-Up

I’ve only just set it up, so definitely please let me know if anything goes wrong!

TV Sketching: Queens of Mystery

Some sketches (done in Procreate) of Queens of Mystery Season 2 Episodes 1 & 2, “Sparring with Death” (Acorn TV).

The usual rules apply: no pausing.

Never enough time to draw houses!
Never trust a sauna
There were some very complicated chairs
Group shots are a trick at speed
Tiny shoelace-tying moment! Also: dramatic lighting remains enjoyable to draw.

It’s a very stylised show, which makes it a lot of fun to sketch: strong clear colour cues and coding, distinctive silhouettes, slightly exaggerated movements. I wouldn’t mind going back and sketching the first season.